Two-Footed dipodic

All I heard
A distant bird
Trouble spurred
Like aging curd
Anthems sweet
Dancing feet
Steps repeat
Don’t skip a beat
Melodic pun
Sense to none
But maybe some
Or only one

Prompt: Skeltonic verse gets its name from John Skelton, a fifteenth-century English poet who pioneered the use of short stanzas with irregular meter, but two strong stresses per line (otherwise know as “dipodic” or “two-footed” verse). The lines rhyme, but there’s not a rhyme scheme per se. The poet simply rhymes against one word until he or she gets bored and moves on to another.

A great prompt for when you are totally exhausted and this is how you are thinking anyways.

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About Mary (tqhousecat)

I am a wife and a mother of two grown children. Recently I have begun writing a couple of blogs. One poetry and one on hope. I only wish that whoever reads this will be blessed, inspired and occasionally amused. Soon to be added is another blog...writings on hope from a biblical perspective. Now it can be seen at purplepandasandotherphenomena.blogspot.com. please feel free to visit.
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One Response to Two-Footed dipodic

  1. I’d never heard of Skeltonic poetry. I like this one. Thanks for sharing, Mary.

    Like

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